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Welcome to the page about handheld radio equipment that is easily available to the public. We'll start by looking at equipment used internationally for specific services, which can unfortunately be abused because the gear is so easy to obtain.

Then we'll move on to the real thing - equipment designed for the use of the public for their own personal and/or business purposes, either licensed or totally free-for-all.

A scanner enthusiast may wish to check for the frequencies of foreign handhelds, in case somebody local is using such unapproved equipment (If your country's laws permit this scanning **IF!** ) due to the portable nature of these transceivers.

This page attempts to keep track of the array of low power systems available to the public (excluding telephones) such as CB, FRS, GMRS, MURS, SRBR etc.

Commercial equipment designed for the professional mobile radio market is not included here, even if it is often available second-hand (expensive when new!) with programming software too. Modified amateur equipment is easier to come by and often covers the same bands, and anyway it could be harder to tell what is genuine or not on these land mobile allocations.

UK systems are included here too, for the benefit of those overseas.




International
Non-public services

VHF Airband 118-137 MHz - 760 AM channels at 25kHz spacing, with newer sets handling 8.33kHz steps in Europe. Handhelds can be bought for 300 GBP or less. Receive coverage from 108-118 also, for info/weather broadcasts and navigation signals. I strongly discourage any unauthorised use of these channels.

Maybe some would argue that the glider or balloon channels are fair game, even if only during bad weather. Bear in mind many scanner folk listen there! In the UK there are many private airline channels at 129.7 to 132 approx - sensible operation there with callsigns might just go almost unnoticed? I still wouldn't recommend it though. Even if you think you've found a clear spare channel (from lots of monitoring) you never know if you're suddenly going to be blaring from a speaker somewhere where that channel is monitored for standby purposes. Even if not, are you sure you won't cause interference to local air traffic via intermodulation images? It isn't worth it! This whole band is VERY carefully planned on an international basis. Please don't upset the system - lives could be at risk.

 broadcasting service

-108.000--

 Aero Navigation services
 (108.05 to 117.95)

-117.975--

 118.000 (001*)
 118.025 (002)
 ...
 121.500  Distress
 ...
 136.950 (759)
 136.975 (760)

-137.000--

 satellite services

* my numbering, not used elsewhere 

VHF Marine band 156-163 MHz, FM channels, 25kHz bandwidth, 25W max. A 28 channel sequence from 156.05 to 157.40 (50kHz steps) with paired channels internationally (shore at +4.6MHz : 160.6** to 162), not all of which pairs are used in the USA. In 1972 channels 60 to 88 were added in between the existing ones, from 156.025 to 157.425 - private channels may also be found between 155-156, at 161, and from 157.45 to 158.5 paired (or not) with 162-163 approx.

As with Airband radios, it's best if you don't use these radios for anything other than their intended purpose. If you prevent coastguards hearing a call for help you could be putting lives at risk.

The paired channels would be useless for illicit purposes handie-to-handie in "international mode"...


  Ship      Shore    (all splits -4.6MHz)

 156.025---160.625
   to        to       ch 1-7 & 60-66
 156.350---160.950    + single ch 6

 156.300   6  intership and Search and Rescue

 156.375  67  Coastguard - Search and Rescue
 156.400   8  intership
 156.425  68
 156.450   9
 156.475  69
 156.500  10
 156.525  70  DSC Digital SelCall ONLY (GMDSS) NO VOICE 
 156.550  11
 156.575  71
 156.600  12
 156.625  72  intership
 156.650  13  International Nav Safety Comms
 156.675  73
 156.700  14
 156.725  74
 156.750  15  1W max
 156.775  75* 1W max
 156.800  16  Calling, Distress
 156.825  76* 1W max
 156.850  17  1W max
 156.875  77  intership

 157.375  87*
 157.425  88*

 156.900---161.500
   to        to       ch 18-28 & 78-88
 157.425---162.025

 * newer channels, may be fitted to sets made
   after 1999 (87 & 88 were paired frequency
   channels but 161.975 and 162.025 are soon
   to be used for AIS Auto. Ident.s)

...sets with an International/USA switch could be used for single-channel use of the 156-157MHz part of a international paired channel - but not 20, 24-28, 64, 84-87 -
see http://www.shakespeare-ef.com/antenna/vhf-freq.htm

UK sets may feature private channels M (157.85) and M2 (161.425) for common Marina use.

Common private Nordic channels for leisure boating are 155.500, 155.525 and 155.650 MHz, and 155.625, 155.775 and 155.825 MHz fishing. Denmark private : P1 155.375, P2 155.575, P3 155.450, P4 155.800.

Use of intership channels would be the least likely to cause serious problems, but Marine handhelds are intended for use on the water by licensed persons! (USA: intership for recreational boaters : 68, 69, 71, 72 and 78A, with 9 for calling. Commercial ship bridge-to-bridge & bridges/locks : 13. Harbors/pilots : 14. Coast Guard Liaison Channel : 22A. Public Correspondence : 24-28 and 84-88)

UHF marine on-board systems - 2W max. Usually used with paired frequencies, with a repeater.

Single, or paired (10 MHz split)

  457.525   467.525
  457.5375  467.5375
  457.550   467.550
  457.5625  467.5625
  457.575   467.575


USA, Canada & the Philippines :
Single, or paired (10.225 MHz split)

  457.525   467.750
  457.550   467.775
  457.575   467.800
  457.600   467.825

Finland : 457.600 and 467.6 : "user certificate required"
and "458.600, 458.625, 458.725, 458,800 MHz : passenger ships"

Amateur Radio handhelds. Most common is equipment for 2 metres (144MHz) and 70cm (430MHz), although some handies cover 6 metres (50MHz) where antennas are unwieldy and inefficient (or worse still - 10 metres - 28MHz), or even 23cm (1290MHz) which is rather too microwave for good portable use. Handies may be single band, dual, or up to all four in one!

10 metres
  28.000 to 29.700

6 metres
  50.000 to 54.000

2 metres
 144.000 to 146.000 (Europe)
 144.000 to 148.000 (other regions)
 
70 centimetres
 430.000 to 440.000 (Europe)
 420.000 to 450.000 (other regions)

Handhelds usually feature multiple
frequency steps from 5kHz up,
5,10,12.5,15,20,25 etc., maybe 6.25 too.

Non-standard allocations such as the USA 220MHz and 900MHz bands, or the UK 70MHz band tend not to feature on mass-produced equipment.

Amateurs tend not to welcome intruders to their bands, so be sure that unauthorised use will be discovered and dealt with! These folk can be very good at finding signal sources :o)

Most amateur HF transceivers can be "opened up" to full AM/SSB/FM coverage over the range up to 30MHz or sometimes even up to beyond 54MHz. A jumper or diode(s) may be removed from the circuit board to enable this. This is usually how Echo Charlie operators pirate the 6.67 MHz band, or how freebanders cover 11 metres. In the same way VHF/UHF handhelds can often be made to cover extended ranges.

2 metre sets may cover as much as 120 to 180 MHz or more, in 5kHz steps, but keeping the 25kHz bandwidth. Fortunately FM doesn't come through too well on AM airband sets, lessening the risk of bogus air traffic control calls (yes, slope detection, I know!).

Similarly 70cm sets may cover up to 400 to 490 MHz or more. There is scope for much interference to private systems, especially as CTCSS can be used, but most owners seem to respect the rest of the spectrum. Trunked PMR systems are harder to break into. Some use of expanded equipment occurs with businesses that either intentionally or in ignorance think they can get away with using a "spare" channel.



International
Public Services

27MHz CB Citizens Band 26.965 to 27.405MHz as used in many countries. These channels were introduced in the USA in 1958 and 1977, with gaps for model control. The channels have been adopted in other countries since, with some countries using lower or higher bands between 26 and 28MHz, sometimes keeping the same sequence order gaps as this made transceivers easier to convert from existing designs.

AM/SSB modes are legal in the USA and some other countries (some in Europe), with FM used on these frequencies in the UK and Europe (harmonised standard known as CEPT or EURO). Elsewhere the modes/channels are in all sorts of combinations worldwide, some with only 22 or 23 channels, or other subsets. Usually 4W for AM/FM and 12W for SSB.

For much more detail, please visit http://www.geocities.com/euro446/rf-man/cb
and the CB FAQ at http://www.indirect.com/www/sxi/cb_faq.htm

40 USA channels (and now EURO/CEPT)
23 from 1958  and 17 more from 1977

--26.96-----1947-1958 ham 11m band--
  26.965  01
  26.975  02
  26.985  03
 (26.995)    (3A)   models "brown"  
  27.005  04
  27.015  05
  27.025  06
  27.035  07
 (27.045)    (7A)   models "red"    
  27.055  08
  27.065  09
  27.075  10
  27.085  11
 (27.095)    (11A)  models "orange" 
  27.105  12
  27.115  13
  27.125  14
  27.135  15
 (27.145)    (15A)  models "yellow" 
  27.155  16
  27.165  17
  27.175  18
  27.185  19
 (27.195)    (19A)  models "green"  
  27.205  20
  27.215  21
  27.225  22
--27.23----end of old 11m ham band--
  27.235  24  (1977)
  27.245  25  (1977) + UK  "blue"   
  27.255  23         + USA "blue"   
  27.265  26  (1977)
    to
  27.405  40  (1977)

This next table shows which countries use the USA/EURO 26.965-27.405 channels, and others. EURO = CEPT PR 27 : ERO decisions (98)11 and (96)02 from recommendation T/R 20-09 (Chester 1990).

* Argentina      AM 4W    SSB 12W
* Australia      AM 4W    SSB 12W   FM 5W
                                            and 477MHz
* Austria                           FM 4W   EURO
* Belgium        AM 0.5W 22ch  SSB  FM 5W  +EURO
* Brasil         AM 4W    SSB 12W
                                            and 20ch more to 27.605
* Canada         AM 4W    SSB 12W
* Croatia                 SSB       FM 4W   EURO
* Cyprus                            FM 4W   EURO
* Czech Republic AM 1W ch1-10       FM 4W  +EURO
* Denmark        AM                 FM 4W  +EURO
* Estonia                           FM 4W   EURO
* Finland        AM 1W    SSB 4W    FM 4W   EURO (AM until 2003?)
* France         AM 1W    SSB 4W    FM 4W  +EURO
* Germany   4-15 AM 1W              FM 4W   EURO
                                            and 40ch 26.565-29.955
* Greece         AM
* Guadeloupe     AM 4W
* Guatemala
* Hungary                           FM 4W   EURO
                                            and 40ch 26.515-26.955
* Iceland                           FM 4W   EURO
  India          AM                         40ch 26.964-27.276
* Ireland        AM                 FM 4W  +EURO
* Italy          AM 5W    SSB       FM 5W
  Japan          AM 0.5W                    8ch 26.968-27.144
                                            and 422 & 903MHz
* Latvia                            FM 4W   EURO
* Liechtenstein                     FM 4W   EURO
* Lithuania                         FM 4W   EURO
* Luxembourg                        FM 4W   EURO
* Macedonia                         FM 4W   EURO
* Mexico         AM 4W
. Namibia        AM 4W    SSB 12W           9ch 27.185-27.295
* Neth./Holland                     FM 4W   EURO
  New Zealand    AM 4W    SSB 12W           40ch 26.330-26.770
* Norway         AM 4W              FM 4W  +EURO
* Poland         AM 4W    SSB 20W   FM 4W  +EURO
* Portugal       AM       SSB       FM 5W  +EURO
* Puerto Rico    AM 4W    SSB 12W
* Romania                 SSB       FM 4W   EURO
* Russia         AM 4W              FM 4W
* Slovak Republic                   FM 4W   EURO
* Slovenia       AM 5W              FM 5W  +EURO
. South Africa   AM 4W    SSB 12W           9ch 27.185-27.275
* Spain          AM 1W    SSB 4W    FM 1W
* Sweden    1-23 AM 3.5W  SSB ch24  FM 4W  +EURO
* Switzerland    AM 1W    SSB 4W    FM 4W  +EURO
                                            and 80ch 903MHz
* Turkey                            FM 4W   EURO
* UK: England,Scotland,Wales,N.Ire  FM 4W   EURO  
                                            and 40ch 27.60125-27.99125
* U.S.A.         AM 4W    SSB 12W

  This table based on internet sources which are not official
  and may contain errors. Any corrections welcomed.

A Euro SSB standard is planned - ETS/EN 300433 - although finding anything on-line is a bit difficult, it seems to be a huge secret!

Some CB-ers don't care much for legalities, and use extra unauthorised channels (some of which may be legal in some countries) which can extend from 25MHz to over 28MHz much to the dismay of amateurs and other services. Here are some of the 11 metre "Freeband" channels (Calling on 27555 and 26285), note that channels 3A,7A,11A,15A and 19A are used also (the gaps for models) and that many operators simply use any frequency they like with converted amateur equipment :

      radio astronomy - 25.55 to 25.6
    broadcasting - 25.6 to 26.1
  maritime allocation - 26.1 to 26.175
-26.175------------------------------

11m "Freeband"
 26.185 to 26.505  CB Lo-Lo ch 11-40,  (-2 x 450kHz)
 26.515 to 26.955  CB Lo    ch  1-40,  (-1 x 450kHz)
(26.965 to 27.405  CB mid band)
 27.415 to 27.855  CB Hi    ch  1-40,  (+1 x 450kHz)
 27.865 to 27.995  CB Hi-hi ch  1-11a, (+2 x 450kHz)

-28.000------------------------------
  Amateur 10 metre band - to 29.7

Also, in many countries with harsher economies, businesses may use CB equipment for communication because it is so much cheaper. The UK CB-ers are finding more and more Eastern European or Russian sounding traffic!

Interestingly, the USA where it all started, doesn't allow communication over ranges greater than 153 miles!


National
Public services


Australian 55MHz LPD in the 54-56MHz band, 2.5mW max. 5 channel handies made by Realistic.

 55.050
 55.150
 55.250


There's an Australian/NZ 477MHz CB "Personal Radio Service" using 476.425 - 477.400 MHz (5W). Repeaters allowed, shift +0.75MHz to TX.
Also available is an HF service, for mobile only, licensed (50$) with callsigns, on 5.455, 8.022, 11.612, 14.977 and 3.995MHz USB.
Standard : http://www.med.govt.nz/rsm/rfs39.pdf

 1 476.425  Repeaters - Output
 2 476.450  Repeaters - Output
 3 476.475  Repeaters - Output
 4 476.500  Repeaters - Output
 5 476.525  Repeaters - Output (Emergency) 
 6 476.550  Repeaters - Output
 7 476.575  Repeaters - Output
 8 476.600  Repeaters - Output
 9 476.625 
10 476.650  (4 by 4)
11 476.675  Calling
12 476.700
13 476.725
14 476.750
15 476.775
16 476.800
17 476.825
18 476.850  (caravans)
19 476.875
20 476.900
21 476.925
22 476.950  Telemetry only
23 476.975  Telemetry only
24 477.000
25 477.025
26 477.050
27 477.075
28 477.100
29 477.125  (Truckies, Pacific highway only)
30 477.150
31 477.175  Repeaters - input 1
32 477.200  Repeaters - input 2
33 477.225  Repeaters - input 3
34 477.250  Repeaters - input 4
35 477.275  Repeaters - input 5 (Emergency) 
36 477.300  Repeaters - input 6
37 477.325  Repeaters - input 7
38 477.350  Repeaters - input 8
39 477.375  
40 477.400  (Truckies Channel)


Austria I'm really not sure about these, more info needed!
http://www.bmv.gv.at/tk/2ofb/zulass/fsbls.htm

LS026 (Ausgabe 01.04.2000, Notifikation 2000/149/A)
500mW
 151.050
 151.075
 151.150

LS033 (Ausgabe 01.04.2000, Notifikation 2000/149/A)
6W 12.5/25kHz
 440.525
 440.550
 440.625
 440.775
(440.750 12W)
 440.825

LS034 (Ausgabe 01.04.2000, Notifikation 2000/149/A)
500mW 12.5/25kHz
 441.150
 441.300
 441.475

LS024 (Ausgabe 01.04.2000, Notifikation 2000/149/A)
500mW
 449.775
 ...
 449.85

Can anyone explain this lot to me?! Please!


Botswana, South Africa 29MHz - 23 AM channels within 29.7-30MHz, 12.5kHz spaced, as used by 4x4 off-roaders.

 1 29.71   General Open ORRA 4x4
 2 29.7225 General Open ORRA 4x4
 3 29.735  Mobile
 4 29.7475 Civil Emergency 1
 5 29.76   Mobile
 6 29.7725 Non-commercial boats
 7 29.785  General Open ORRA 4x4
 8 29.7975 Mobile
 9 29.81   Mobile
10 29.8225 Civil Emergency 111
11 29.835  Mobile
12 29.8475 Civil Emergency Calling
13 29.86   Mobile
14 29.8725 General Open ORRA 4x4
15 29.885  General Open ORRA 4x4
16 29.8975 General Open ORRA 4x4
17 29.91   Mobile
18 29.9225 Fire (Rural) Civil Emergency
19 29.935  Safety of vessels at sea
20 29.9475 Civil Emergency 11
21 29.96   Mobile
22 29.9725 Boats at sea and on inland waters
23 29.985  Government


Brasil 27MHz CB - 20 extra channels, the USA/CEPT channels extended up to 27.605 MHz, 7W AM and 21W SSB.
http://www.nwm.com.br/wgreletronica/código.htm

 29.965 01
 ...       (USA/CEPT)
 27.405 40
 27.415 41
 27.425 42
 ...
 27.585 58
 27.595 59 Emergency use 
 27.605 60 Emergency use 


A Czech PDF document from 2005 lists a number of Low Power allocations for portable-only use...

max 1W, 16kHz bandwidth
77.025
77.05
77.075
77.1
77.725
78.0
81.725
81.75

10kHz max bandwidth (16kHz permitted until end of 2010)
172.65  5W
172.725 1W
172.95  5W
172.975 5W
173.05  1W

14kHz max bandwidth
448.490 5W
448.570 5W
448.610 5W
449.770 1W
449.810 1W


In China / HK, 409MHz SRPR public channels (20) within 409.750-409.9875 (12.5kHz, 500mW) - 6th December 2001. See a Hong Kong PDF at http://www.ofta.gov.hk/ad-comm/rsac/paper/rsac5-2002.pdf

 1 409.750
..
20 409.9875


The European 433MHz LPD (10mW) band bounded by 433.05 and 434.79 MHz (or 433.92MHz +/- 0.87). This band can be used in most Euro countries for remote control and telemetry, and in some also for voice. Voice modes not allowed in Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Luxembourg, UK. Handhelds tend to have 69 channels at 433.075 - 434.775 MHz, 25kHz spacing/bandwidth, with CTCSS. This falls within the amateur 70cms band (in all regions), in the UK's repeater outputs/inputs and simplex FM segment ( 433.8-434.35 (channels 30-52) is probably the least used part where you'd go unnoticed - apart from the heavily used 433.92 area). Amateurs are Secondary Users of this band and are not supposed to listen to any other users, even to work out whether they may be licenced Primary Users or intruders - it's none of their business, rather it's up to the Primary Users or OFCOM to deal with (amateurs may perhaps be entitled to monitor use of their PRIMARY *unshared* bands, but a licencing difficulty remains that an amateur is not allowed to listen to any other user apart from specific general services such as BROADCASTING - and most definitely not allowed to listen to unlicenced users. If it becomes apparent that a user is not using amateur callsigns within a reasonable period, the amateur must cease listening because he cannot verify that the station is another amateur). So it's questionable whether an amateur has a legal 'leg to stand on' to hound you off the air or report you. You *could* be a military cadet, for example :-)
See http://www.ero.dk/doc98/official/word/rec7003E.doc


---433.05---
 1 433.075 (RB3) 1-13: UK amateur repeater outputs
 2 433.100 (RB4)
 3 433.125 (RB5)
 4 433.150 (RB6)
 5 433.175 (RB7)
 6 433.200 (RB8)
 7 433.225 (RB9)
 8 433.250 (RB10)
 9 433.275 (RB11)
10 433.300 (RB12)
11 433.325 (RB13)
12 433.350 (RB14)
13 433.375 (RB15)
14 433.400 (SU16) 14-21: UK amateur simplex FM
 ...
18 433.500 (SU20) Calling)
19 433.525 (SU21) + GB2RS news - Sundays
20 433.550 (SU22) + Rally talk-in
21 433.575 (SU23)
22 433.600  22-61: UK amateur digital and emergency channels.
 ...
35 433.925 - numerous LPD, remotes, car locking, home 'weather stations', etc around here
 ...
39 434.025
---434.04--- OFCOM categories boundary
40 433.050  First UK legal 10mW channel - BUT : Amateur 12.5kHz data channel
   434.0625 Experimental Amateur MPT1327 Base TX Ch 1
41 434.075  Experimental Amateur MPT1327 Base TX Ch 2
   434.0875 Experimental Amateur MPT1327 Base TX Ch 3
42 434.100  (too close to above Amateur channel)

43 434.125  First clear 10mW channel?
44
45
46 434.200  proposed calling channel
47
48
49
50
51
52

53 434.375  Amateur EmerComms 1.6MHz Talkthrough  - mobile TX

54
55
56

57 434.475 (57-59: UK amateur internet gateways)
58 434.500
59 434.525

60
61

62 434.600 (RB0) 62-69: UK amateur repeater inputs
 ...
68 434.750 (RB6 in)
69 434.775 (RB7 in)
---434.79---


The European 446MHz PMR446 (500mW) system - most of Europe including the UK. 8 channels, 12.5kHz bandwidth. Designed for unregulated use by anybody. Some countries require licenses and/or business use only.
See Euro446 for more details.


---446.0----
 1 446.00625
 2 446.01875
 3 446.03125
 4 446.04375
 5 446.05625
 6 446.06875
 7 446.08125
 8 446.09375  CB-style calling (88.5Hz)
---446.1----


The European 868-870MHz SRD band. Intended for general Short Range Devices and Alarm systems, ERC/DEC(01)04 : http://www.ero.dk/documentation/docs/doc98/official/pdf/DEC0104.PDF - implemented by some Euro admins (incl. UK) - Germany doesn't allow voice or any audio.. http://www.ero.dk/documentation/docs/implement.asp?docid=1463
Alan have released a 25/5mW 126 channel radio the Alan 860
- see (http://www.mega-com.nl)
- with the following channels. 869.3-869.4 (C2) was not in ERC/DEC(01)04, but is in later documents. FM in bands apart from C2 and D probably falls foul of TX duty cycle % requirements.


---868.0----
868.00625 1   Band A  25mW 1%
868.01875 2   12.5kHz
...
868.59375 48
---868.6----
   (alarms 10mW)
---868.7----
868.70625 1   Band B  25mW 0.1%
868.71875 2   12.5kHz
...
869.19375 40
---869.2----
   (alarms 10mW)
---869.3----
869.3125 1    Band C2 10mW any%
869.3375 2    25kHz
869.3625 3
869.3875 4
---869.4----
869.4125 1    Band C 500mW 10%
869.4375 2    25kHz
...
869.6375 10
---869.65---
   (alarms 25mW)
---869.7----
869.70625 1   Band D   5mW any%
869.71875 2   12.5kHz
...
869.99375 24
---870.0----


Finland - 68-72MHz RHA68 - low power system. "Common channels for hobby usage in general" (RHA68 4.2.2000). 5W. (6.4.1998)
22 channel Handheld available (CLICK FOR PIC).
See http://www.agripalvelu.fi/vhf.html - handy details
and http://www.agripalvelu.fi/STAR_PA4099_tekniset.html - channels

More details wanted! Thanks :o)
"In Finland use of the RHA68 band always requires a licence from the Finnish Communications Regulatory Authority. But there is no examination or other special requirements to fulfill to be able to use the band. You just apply for a licence, pay the licence fee (priced per transmitter) and use the band. And of course you have to obey the channel allocations" - thanks 'TS' on the forum.
Spectrum in English : http://www.thk.fi/englanti/radio/Taulukko2.htm

 1 68.050 | E5
 2 68.175 | E7
 3 67.500 | E8
 4 71.375 | E9
 5 71.425 | E10
 6 71.475 | E11  "Yleinen harrastuskanava"
 7 71.625 | E12  (Common channels for hobby usage in general)
 8 68.575 | E6
 9 70.200 | E13
10 71.025 | E14
11 71.050 | E15
12 71.100 | E16
13 68.100   A1  Tiepalvelu      "road service organisations"
14 68.300   A2  Autourheilu     "motor sports"
15 68.425   A3  Pelastuspalvelu "voluntary rescue organisations" (25W)
16 68.525   A4  Autourheilu     "motor sports"
17 68.225   A17 Pelastuspalvelu "voluntary rescue organisations" (25W)
18 71.575 |
19 72.325 |
20 71.350 | Elinkeinoelämän yhteiskäyttökanava "common PMR channels"
21 71.550 |
22 71.600 |


In France - 446.9MHz RPS (Radio Professionnelle Simplifiée) is an SRBR. License-free, 500mW, 3 12.5kHz channels.

446.950
446.975
446.9875


German 26MHz CB - an extra 40 channels to make 80 in all. Straight 10kHz spaced sequence from 26.565 to 26.955 :

41  26.565
42  26.575
...
79  26.945
80  26.955
(1  26.965)


The German 149MHz 'Freenet' LPD system - 1997 to 2005. 6 channel handies (3 new channels added January 2007). 500mW max, simple license, 12.5kHz. Not for use in border regions.
Also as Swedish SRBR? http://ham.srsab.se/SWL/frekvvhf.html

1 149.025
2 149.0375
3 149.050
4 149.0875
5 149.100
6 149.1125


Hungary 26MHz CB - an extra 40 channels. Mid band -450kHz, i.e. Lo Band.

 1  26.515
 2  26.525
... (gaps)
39  26.945
40  26.955
(1  26.965)


India : 27MHz CB.
40 channels, 8kHz spaced, within 26.957-27.283MHz. See http://www.nic.in/nfap-2000/p02.htm

26964 Hobbies
26972 Hobbies
26980 Highway comms
26988  spare
26996  spare
27004 R/C Aero
27012 Rural comms
27020 Special R/C Devices
27028 Rural comms
27036 Hobbies
27044 RTA reporting
27052 RTA reporting
27060 Life Saving (Coastal/Rivers/Lakes)
27068 Life Saving (Coastal/Rivers/Lakes)
27076 Disaster Relief
27084 Disaster Relief
27092 Wildlife/Forestry
27100 Wildlife/Forestry
27108 Special R/C Devices
27116 R/C Aero
27124 Hobbies
27132  spare
27140 Mountaineering
27148 R/C Aero
27156 R/C Aero
27164  spare
27172 Rural comms
27180  spare
27188  spare
27196  spare
27204 Mountaineering
27212 Rural comms
27220 Sport Events
27228 R/C Aero
27236 Highway comms
27244 Sport Events
27252  spare
27260 R/C Toys
27268  spare
27276  spare


India : 350MHz SRR. Short Range Radio at 2W. see http://www.dotindia.com/wpcc/NFAP/remarks.htm (google for 350.2250)
radio: http://www.hyt.cn/02product/detail.asp?ProdId=4350

 350.225
 350.2375
 350.250
 350.2625
(350.275)

 350.350
 350.3625
 350.375
 350.3875
 350.400


In Indonesia, 142MHz , 60 channels 25kHz spaced within 142.0375-143.6375. "The new frequency allocations (142 & 476 MHz) were regulated in a decision by the Director General of Posts and Telecommunications in decreee Number 92 Year 1994 on Implementing Regulation of the Inter-Citizens Radio Communications." 10/15/25W?
http://www.postel.go.id/content/ID/regulasi%5Cfrekuensi%5Ckepmen%5Ckm%20nomor%2077-2003%20krap.pdf

   142.000 repeaters
   142.025 repeaters
 1 142.050
..
 9 142.250 Emergency
..
60 143.525
   143.550 repeaters
   143.575 repeaters


In Indonesia, 467MHz , 40 channels within 467.425-477.400? seen as spec for Maxon handheld http://www.maxon.co.kr/uploads/productreport/m-222p.pdf

 1 467.425
..
40 477.400


In Italy, 43MHz LPD contains 24 channels from 43.3 to 43.5875 (12.5kHz), max 5W. From 1998. For specific purposes :o)
see http://www.negrinielettronica.com/43_mhz.htm

 1 43.300  |
 2 43.3125 | Security & rescue
 3 43.325  | surveillance
 4 43.3375 |
 5 43.350  |
 6 43.3625 |___________________________
 7 43.375  |
 8 43.3875 |
 9 43.400  | Commercial enterprises
10 43.4125 |
11 43.425  |
12 43.4375 |___________________________
13 43.450  |
14 43.4625 | Yachts and marinas
15 43.475  |
16 43.4875 |___________________________
17 43.500  |
18 43.5125 | Air clubs & sport aircraft
19 43.525  |
20 43.5375 |___________________________
21 43.550  |
22 43.5625 | Medical surveillance
23 43.575  |
24 43.5875 |

See this catalogue : http://www.intek-com.it/catalogo/pag15.html


Italy, 49 & 53MHz unconfirmed (rumour dept.)

"Italian 7 metres - 49.1 to 49.5 MHz FM - 20 channels are legal with 5 watts. Calling channel is 49.250 MHz."

"Italy - Pirate 6 metres? 53.5 to 53.950 MHz all modes, FM calling channel 53.75 MHz, SSB calling channel 53.525 MHz."

Any info gratefully received! See details at bottom of this page. Thanks.


Japan, 27MHz CB - 8 channels, 500mW, AM. Antenna : whip less than 0.199m - cannot use ext.antenna.
http://www.kinopy.nu/e/jpncb.html
http://www.tele.soumu.go.jp/e/search/share/20020919/a5.pdf

 1 26.968
 2 26.976
 3 27.040
   27.048   R/C
 4 27.080
 5 27.088
 6 27.112
 7 27.120 + R/C & mics
   27.136   R/C
 8 27.144
   27.152   R/C


Japan, 154MHz. 9 Channels, 20kHz spaced.
http://www.geocities.co.jp/Technopolis/1130/frq.html

 1 154.45
 ..
 9 154.61


Japan, 348MHz 20 channels for business use, 1W, 12.5kHz FM. Radios must be equipped with a control ROM for Auto-Callsign and Digital ID by 1200bps/4800bps MSK.
http://members.aol.com/AB449/chr.html (347.7-351.9MHz? http://www.telec.or.jp/eng/details/_03/23_e01.htm )

 1 348.5625
 2 348.575
 3 348.5875
 4 348.600
 5 348.6125
 6 348.625
 7 348.6375
 8 348.650
 9 348.6625
10 348.675
11 348.6875
12 348.700
13 348.7125
14 348.725
15 348.7375
16 348.750
17 348.7625
18 348.775
19 348.7875 Data
20 348.800  Data


Japan, 421MHz 19 channels 12.5kHz FM.

 1 421.575
..
19 421.8


Japan, 422MHz 11 channels for business use, 10mW, 12.5kHz FM. Radios must be equipped with a control ROM for Auto-Callsign and Digital ID by 1200bps/4800bps MSK.
http://members.aol.com/AB449/chr.html
i.e. UBZ-LH20 http://www.cqcqde.com/shopping/handy/ubz-lh20.htm

 1 422.050
 2 422.0625
 3 422.075
 4 422.0875
 5 422.100
 6 422.1125
 7 422.125
 8 422.1375
 9 422.150
10 422.1625
11 422.175


Japan, 422MHz UHF CB "Specific Low Power Radio" - 10mW for hobby/leisure. Newly-authorized in 1989, mostly used for handhelds. 12.5kHz spacing, 9 single channels and 9 paired on 421/440 MHz. Radios must be equipped with a control ROM for Auto-Callsign and Digital ID by 1200bps/4800bps MSK.

  Paired - split 18.45 MHz

1 421.8125  440.2625
2 421.825   440.275
3 421.8375  440.2875
4 421.850   440.300
5 421.8625  440.3125
6 421.875   440.325
7 421.8875  440.3375
8 421.900   440.350
9 421.9125  440.3625

  Single

1 422.200
2 422.2125
3 422.225
4 422.2375
5 422.250
6 422.2625
7 422.275
8 422.2875
9 422.300


Japan, 465MHz, 12.5kHz spaced

 1 465.0375
..
10 465.15

11 468.55
..
35 468.85


Japan, 903MHz "Personal Radio", 5W, 158 12.5kHz FM channels from 903.0125 to 904.9875 - external antennas are permitted. Radios must be equipped with a control ROM for Auto-Callsign and Digital ID by 1200bps/4800bps MSK.
Standard : http://www.telec.or.jp/eng/details/_03/21_e01.htm

 903.0125 F2D (data)

 903.0375 F3E (FM)
 903.050
 ...
 904.975  157
 904.9875 158


In Korea, 448MHz FRS consists of 25 channels - 15 from 448.75 to 448.925 (12.5kHz, 500mW) and 10 more at 449.15 to 449.2625 - http://hitop.net/hitop/pr/uhfcb.htm

 1 448.75
 2 448.7625
 ...
14 448.9125
15 448.925

16 449.150
17 449.1625
...
24 449.250
25 449.2625


In Malaysia, 477MHz FRS consists of 39 channels within 477.5-478 (12.5kHz, 500mW). See a PDF at http://corona.cmc.gov.my/legislation/acrobat/puB109.pdf or a text version thanks to Google's cache.
http://www.phone.com.my/samsung/KF-310.htm

 1 477.5125
..
39 477.9875

Author: Firdaus
Subject: Malaysia PR 477MHZ
Regarding to Malaysia UHF CB or PRS 477mhz.(no license)

The correct frequency and channel for Malaysia is from 477.0125 to 477.4875 MHZ (5 Watt) 12.5 khz step and from 477.5250 MHZ to 477.9875 MHZ (12.5kz steo power output 0.5 Watt) for short range or recreational use. 477.1375 MHZ Calling Channel (5W), 477.1125 Mhz is for emergency use. For short range or recreational calling channnel frequency is 477.6500 mhz and 477.6250 mhz is for emergency use.


Netherlands 170MHz more info needed!
"landelijk rijscholen porto kanaal 1 & 2"
Icom handheld : http://www.velltec.com/trx/icom.htm

 1  170.350  (rijschool witteveen)
 2  170.390

UPDATE : "used for Driving schools (at least it used to be), it's either been disused by now or it may still be in use by motorcycle driving instructers. Greetings, Greg" - many thanks!


New Zealand 26MHz CB (mid band -635kHz with gaps etc.) SSB from 27.610 upwards (http://pca.cc/RADIO_FREQS/cb_freqs.html)

 1 26.33
 2 26.34
...(gaps)
15 26.50 Calling
...(gaps)
39 26.76
40 26.77


Norway 5W hunting radios (jaktradio).

1 143.90
2 139.40
3 143.35
4 138.85
5 143.25
6 138.75


The Philippines, Singapore & Brunei 325MHz SRRS 40 channel service that operates 325.0 to 325.4875 (300mW? 2.5W?).
http://www.geocities.com/ognek_6969/srrs.html
Philippines 14ch to 325.325?

 1 325.000
 2 325.0125
 ...
39 325.475
40 325.4875


Poland, 154MHz. 4 channel service, pro only? "CTCSS or DCS is required. RF power limit is 1W. Only portable radios and no external antenna"
Kenwood TK-261 : http://www.wrx.sk/kenwood/professional_radios/portable/tk_261_361.html
In Russia too? http://www.socintech.ru/kenwood/portables/TK-261-spec.htm

 154.600
 154.800
 154.825
 154.850


Romania 27.5MHz CB - extra channels - rumour?
ftp://ftp.infoform.ch/CBCB/Break/Break151.pdf says 27.41 to 27.66 is used (channels 27.415-27.655) - but I believe Romania uses the CEPT channels. Any info welcome.


Singapore - 477MHz "Multi-channels Localised Radio (1W)
See www.ida.gov.sg

1  477.0125   6  477.1375
2  477.0375   7  477.1625
3  477.0625   8  477.1875
4  477.0875   9  477.2125
5  477.1125   10 477.2375


South Africa - 464MHz short range business radios, 5W.
See http://docweb.pwv.gov.za/docs/notices/1996/notice96.0018.txt
radios : http://www.interaction.co.za/zartek/specs.html
500mW limit?

1 463.975
2 464.125
3 464.175
4 464.325
5 464.375


Sweden - 31MHz service, details not fully known. 24 FM channels, irregular 10kHz spacings. Maximum power 3.5W for some channels, 1W on others. From 1993?
See http://home.swipnet.se/alfakom

 1 30.930

 2 31.040
 3 31.050 Kanal 1
 4 31.060 Kanal 2
 5 31.070
 6 31.080 1W 
 7 31.090 1W 
 8 31.100 1W 
 9 31.110 1W 
10 31.120 1W 

11 31.140
12 31.150
13 31.160 Kanal 3

14 31.180 1W 
15 31.190 1W 
16 31.200 1W 
17 31.210 1W 
18 31.220 1W 

19 31.250 Kanal 4
20 31.260 Kanal 5
21 31.270

22 31.330 Kanal 6
23 31.340

24 31.570


Sweden, 155MHz unconfirmed (rumour dept.) 25kHz FM, 5W - June 2001
http://www.pts.se/dokument/getFile.asp?FileID=2305

Jaktkanal VHF
155.425 1
155.475 2
155.500 3
155.525 4

156.000 16?

Radiopejling av djur ??
152.0125 12
152.0375 13
152.0625 14
152.0875 15
152.1125 16

155 : "Jordbruksföretag får här tillstånd på två kanaler som ofta användes som jaktradio. Till skillnad mot 27 och 31 MHz kan man helt ostört ha radioförbindelser med högsta kvalitet på dessa kanaler. Ett enkelt tonselektiv användes som gör att man inte störs av andra jaktlag. Selektivet bygger på en kontinuerlig ton under talfrekvensområdet, s.k. pilotton eller tonsquelch, även kallat CTCSS. Detta selektiv hindrar ej avlyssning. Små behändiga apparater med perfekt ljudkvalitet och bra räckvidd. Dock förekommer billiga fabrikat av sämre kvalitet. Kräver tillstånd."

152 : "Vargar och andra sällsynta djur förses i forskningssammanhang med en liten radiosändare för att man skall kunna lokalisera djuret i naturen. Systemet kan även användas för att pejla sin jakthund med. Genom att man låter denna sändare skicka ut korta bärvågs pulser med låg effekt kan man få lång batteri livslängd. Genom att nyttja en känslig mottagare med smala filter, (CW mottagare) samt en riktantenn kan man uppnå avsevärda räckvidder. För att lyssna behövs en mottagare med SSB eller CW läge, samt möjlighet att justera frekvensen i mindre än 100 Hz steg. En bärbar riktantenn som man kan vrida polariteten på är en fördel. Frekvenserna är inte tillståndspliktiga. Utrustningar av detta slag ser man ofta i TV naturprogram. Frekvenserna är"
Animal tracking radiolocation?

Any tranlations/info gratefully received! See details at bottom of this page. Thanks.


In Sweden, 444MHz SRBR is a 6 channel service, 1W.
http://home.swipnet.se/~w-15926/plutoscan/bandplan.htm
Same system used in Norway too, known as KDR (Kort Distanse Radio).

1 444.600
2 444.650
3 444.800
4 444.825
5 444.850
6 444.975


Switzerland, 430MHz SRBR - 3 channels, 500mW, CTCSS, from 1999 (?), license is 84/year per pair. Also used in neighbouring Liechtenstein.
http://meister-boerse.ch/alberkomm/funk/S100.html

430.1375
430.1625
430.3375


Switzerland, 933/934MHz CB - 80 channels, 5W, from 1983 until end of 2003 on a NIB Non Interference Basis.
Band A is 40 channels on 933 - for data purposes - "transmission de données, par exemple Packet-Radio"
Band B is the other 40 channels on 934, for voice, except ch.s 10,11,38,39 for data links, and 20-25 for data modes.
see http://www.infoform.ch/CBCB/frequences_cb.html
or http://homepage.swissonline.ch/usac/frequences.html

Band A - Data
 933.0125  1  Calling
 933.0375  2
 ...
 933.9875 40

Band B - Voice
 934.0125  1
 934.0375  2
 ...
 934.9875 40


Taiwan, 467MHz - 14 channels, 12.5kHz spaced

 1 467.5125
..
14 467.675


Thailand, 78MHz CB - 80 channels, 10W, from 1998 (96?)
Announcement (in English) http://www.ptd.go.th/law_ptd/PTD_Announcement(78MHz).pdf
Rigs must be yellow!

 1 78.0000
...
80 78.9875


Thailand, 245MHz CB - 80 channels, 10W, from 1998 (96?)
Announcement (in English) http://www.ptd.go.th/law_ptd/PTD_Announcement(245MHz).pdf
Rigs must be red!
ADI 245BM http://www.tccom.co.th/p_herm2099.html

 1 245.0000
...
80 245.9875


UK CB (27/81) (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man, Channel Islands) allocated in 1981 - the CEPT channels were allowed a few years later making 80 in all at 27MHz. 4W FM. Straight 10kHz spaced sequence. UK CB licenses cost 15 GBP, optional callsigns available in 2anaa format where a=alpha n=numeric e.g. 2A1BC.

 1 27.60125
 2 27.61125
...
39 27.98125
40 27.99125


The UK 49MHz LPD band at 49.82 to 49.98 (boundaries) may be used for voice - very low range though, very low power (10mW) and inefficient antennas. Typical frequencies - as used by the Maxon 5 channel set:


--49.82--
A 49.83
B 49.845
C 49.86
D 49.875
E 49.89
--49.98--

This band is extensively used for baby monitors, which complicates matters even further.


The UK 461MHz SRBR Short Range Business Radio service continues until 31.Dec.2003 - 500mW max. Licensed use only, although not necessarily business only. Handhelds, CTCSS, 12.5kHz channels.

 461.2625
 461.475
 461.4875

(461.300  paging only)


The UK 934MHz CB band (934/81) Legal from 2.Nov.1981 to 31.12.1998 and was lost to the expansion of cellular phone bands. 8W, 20 channels, 50kHz spaced, 25kHz bandwidth. Was included in the 15 GBP CB license.

UK CB ** NO LONGER LICENSED **

 1 934.0125
 2 934.0625
 ...
19 934.9125
20 934.9625


The USA 150MHz/UHF 'Dot' system. Common commercial frequencies, used (and abused) throughout the US for all kinds of things. "Dot" stickers are used by the manufacturer or distributer to indicate the frequency of otherwise identical transceivers.

Joe Montierth reports : (thanks!)
"Back in the 1970s a new company called Ritron started making inexpensive business band handheld radios, that sold in the $200 price range. This was unheard of, since Motorola, GE, RCA and the big boys were selling their handies for around $1000 each. These Ritron radios filled a niche market for those businesses that wanted radio, but couldn't afford it.

Ritron decided that to make things easy, they would sell mainly on channels that had been set aside by the FCC as low power channels. They picked a few of the most popular frequencies, and "color coded" them so that the end user just had to remember a "color dot". 154.57 might be "blue dot" and 154.600 might be "blue dot" (etc). This caught on, and other manufacturers started making low cost radios, and selling them with the same "color dot" scheme."

These radios were only available from radio dealers to begin with, but ended up being sold to the public with little regard for licensing. The abuse of these channels has led to the call for MURS.

o "Dot" colours  o

 Red       151.625  itinerant 
 Purple    151.955            
 Blue      154.570  (now MURS)
 Green     154.600  (now MURS)
 White     462.575  GMRS      
 Black     462.625  GMRS      
 Orange    462.675  GMRS      
 Brown     464.500  itinerant 
 Yellow    464.550  itinerant 
 "J" Dot   467.7625
 "K" Dot   467.8125


* "Star" colours  *

 Silver    467.850 
 Gold      467.875 
 Red       467.900 
 Blue      467.925 

Additional itinerant frequencies include 27.49, 35.04, 43.04, 151.505, 158.400, 469.500, 469.550 and 853.4875 MHz.

Use of this equipment in the UK has been detected.


The USA 150MHz MURS Multi-Use Radio Service, introduced late 2000. This allows 2W unlicensed use on two existing (abused) 154MHz business frequencies, and on three new ones in between existing 30kHz spaced business channels. +/-2.5kHz maximum deviation on the 151 channels. An original 12.5kHz bandwidth allowance on the existing 154 channels was raised to allow +/-5kHz deviation. Rules : http://www.provide.net/~prsg/mursrule.htm

1 151.820  (11.25)
2 151.880  (11.25)
3 151.940  (11.25)

4 154.570  (20)
5 154.600  (20)


The USA 218-219MHz IVDS service is interesting : http://ftp.fcc.gov/wtb/prs/ivds.html


The USA Defense Dept. 396-399MHz ISR (Intra-Squad Radio) handhelds. Icom supply more than 13,000 IC-4008M radios after having won the contract in 2000. 14 channels, 12.5kHz FM, < 500mW. Contract details :
http://www.ld.com/cbd/archive/2000/02(February)/29-Feb-2000/58sol003.htm
Available for use by many government agencies that couldn't legally use FRS for simple low range uses. No idle chatting allowed, proper radio procedure intended.

 1  396.875
 2  397.175
 3  397.175
 4  397.375
 5  397.425
 6  397.475
 7  397.550
 8  397.950
 9  398.050
10  399.425
11  399.475
12  399.725
13  399.925
14  399.975


The USA FRS Family Radio Service (June 1996) 462/467MHz service uses two UHF band segments with channels interleaved between the USA GMRS channels at 462.55 - 462.725 and 467.55 - 467.725 MHz. Deregulated, 12.5kHz bandwidth, max. power 500mW.
FRS allowed in Canada from 2000-apr-01, and Brazil from 2002.
( http://tinyurl.com/2fpbq ) : "..Canada, Mexico, Brazil, and Taiwan. The TalkAbout Radios will also work in Argentina on the first 7 frequencies."

FRS/GMRS plan

 1 462.5625 *
 2 462.5875 *
 3 462.6125 *
 4 462.6375 *
 5 462.6625 *
 6 462.6875 *
 7 462.7125 *

 8 467.5625
 9 467.5875
10 467.6125
11 467.6375
12 467.6625
13 467.6875
14 467.7125

* shared with GMRS single (5W ERP).
  Also these channels fit between 25kHz
  GMRS repeater outputs (and simplex)


The USA GMRS General Mobile Radio Service (1989) 462/467MHz service uses two UHF band segments at 462.55 - 462.725 and 467.55 - 467.725 MHz.
GMRS is licensed at $80 for 5 years (intruders unwelcome!), 25kHz bandwidth, 50W max. The "interstitial" frequencies are shared with FRS channels 1 to 7. Repeater output channels may be used singly ("talkaround"), with 5W maximum power.

Canada allows 2W GMRS (no repeaters) since sept 2004 ( http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/epic/internet/insmt-gst.nsf/en/sf08202e.html )

FRS/GMRS plan

         Repeater   Mobile  (+5 MHz split)

         462.550    467.550 *
(FRS-1)  462.5625
         462.575    467.575 *
(FRS-2)  462.5875
         462.600    467.600
(FRS-3)  462.6125
         462.625    467.625
(FRS-4)  462.6375
         462.650    467.650
(FRS-5)  462.6625
         462.675    467.675  Emergency use (141.3Hz)
(FRS-6)  462.6875
         462.700    467.700
(FRS-7)  462.7125
         462.725    467.725
            |          |
            |       This column for
            |       repeater inputs ONLY
            |
         Channels in this column
         may be used singly

* may suffer some interference from
  International marine UHF on 467MHz

For non-Americans, I'll explain the word interstitial (rhymes with initial) which you may see in conjunction with GMRS, refering to channels between other channels i.e. the channels shared with FRS.
An interstice ("inter-stiss") is "a space, especially a small or narrow one, between things or parts" according to www.dictionary.com - from the Latin interstitium "to pause, make a break".

Note that 467MHz frequencies are only allowed as repeater inputs or FRS channels. Repeater outputs and higher powered GMRS single-freq.-simplex must take place on 462MHz.


An old USA 900MHz V-Link System - a toy manufactured by Yes! Entertainment, a now bankrupt toy manufacturer. 19 channels, no CTCSS or DCS.
Info at http://www.avatar-mail.com/delphi/v-link.html

916.875   1 (Main/Home Frequency)
915.8625  2
915.0     3
914.0875  4
913.3375  5
912.0     6
910.9125  7
910.2375  8
909.3375  9
908.5    10
907.6625 11
907.0    12
906.3375 13
905.6625 14
904.5    15
904.0    16
903.4875 17
903.0    18
902.5    19


Here's an idea - consider all the various recent new varieties of low power business radios, everything on this page in fact. It may well happen that many of these radios get taken to other countries and used there, where the allocations differ. Interference could be a problem. Many manufacturers use the same casing for radios destined for different markets, and it can be difficult to tell which is which. The difference between an FRS and PMR446 set may only be obvious if you know that FRS has 14 channels whereas PMR446 has 8. However, many countries now have differing 3-channel SRBR services!

Many of these new services use frequencies in the amateur 70cm band - either in the 440-450 segment which is a potential intrusion for the USA/Canada, or even within the globally common 430-440 part of the band. I believe the international amateur community should call for a compulsory marking scheme to assist the identification of these handhelds. In Europe a CEPT compliant CB has to be marked as, for example "PR 27 GB" in the UK. Would it not be easier if handhelds had to have a clear marking such as "446 EU", "433 EU", "430 CH", "444 SE", "448 KR", "446.9 FR", "462/7 USA", "461 GB", "325 S", "43 IT", "149 DE", "477 AU" ... ?


Any further info welcome! Please leave a message on the board at http://www.voy.com/176326/ or post to Usenet newsgroup uk.rec.radio.cb - message title "For RF-man", thanks.

When I last played here it was 22 Oct 2009.

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